Student reflection on digital story project

As our digital story project wound down last week (and as I slowly watch them for assessment), I had my students take a quick online survey (using Google Docs) to get some feedback about the project. This was the first time I have done this digital story (using narrative paragraph writing about a memory object) and I wondered what their perceptions were about the creative work they had accomplished.

Here are the results:

My reactions: the results show that there was a high level of interest and engagement in this project (something I saw clearly in the classroom), that many students prefer working within the realm of multimedia, that the end product brought them satisfaction, and that some of them are now making movies and digital stories on their own.

In fact, in parent teacher conferences last week, a number of parents remarked on the positive remarks students were giving and how many of the kids were going home to make their own digital stories on the home computer. I love how the skills from school can transfer to home because it shows that the learning has meaning and value for them.

I also had a box for advice to me on how to improve this project. Most talked about wanting to make their own music and not have to choose from PhotoStory (yeah, I understand). Others said they could have used more class time. A few suggested longer stories next time. But this one comment hit my heart because it shows the power of the story this student told (and it was powerful):

To have to memory be happy not sad. When I was recording I had to keep from crying. It was hard. When I listened to the final story, I was crying.

Peace (in reflection),
Kevin

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3 Comments
  1. Wow! That’s a powerful response and to think it was shared with you. There is safety in your classroom, enough to allow students to emote and not feel overly vulnerable. You are trusted. Good job Kevin!
    Gail

  2. How wonderful that your student felt comfortable enough to share that story with you … and (maybe most important?) that the student felt safe enough in your class to keep going with the project even once she or he realized how challenging and charged the story was going to be. That says so much for the atmosphere you’ve created with your students. Amazing.

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