When Geeks Get Mad

The latest series in my Boolean Squared comics is all about what happens when the geek kids get picked on by the school bullies. They respond in the only way they know … with technology. Come on in and see what Boolean and Urth are up to when they deal with “the bully boys” at their school.

The twice-weekly comic is found at the Springfield Republican Newspaper. But here is the RSS feed and also my own home to the Boolean Squared collection.

Peace (in kids),
Kevin

Boolean and the Star Tech Team

The latest in my Boolean Squared comic is that Boolean has been asked to join his school’s Student Council and has launched a student-led Star Tech team that helps implement technology in his school (props to Steve, my school’s tech guru for giving me the idea).

See Boolean Squared and also, grab the RSS feed.

Peace (in little frames),
Kevin

Boolean in the WebComicCollage

My webcomic, Boolean Squared, has been added to a new site called WebComicCollage, which is a visual indez of various webcomics. I’m pretty excited to see him there in the mix.

Remember: Boolean Squared gets posted to the newspaper site every Monday and Thursday now (see today’s comic) and then are also archived over at my Home for Boolean Squared. The RSS Feed for Boolean Squared is right here for you, if you want it.

Peace (in funnies),
Kevin

Dancing Chickens? You bet.

One of my running gags in my Boolean Squared comic is that the boys want to see a legendary “dancing chicken” video on YouTube (or MeTube, for them). But all the firewalls block it and their teachers sees no value in a dancing chicken (do you?).

Anyway, my series on The Flat World continues this morning over at the webcomic home at MassLive, the online home to the large regional newspaper. Take a look if you get a moment. (And I believe the comic will start running on Thursdays starting this week, too. Here is the RSS feed if you want automatic updates)

Peace (bawk bawwwwkk),
Kevin

Skyping the World with Boolean Squared

This week, my webcomic strip tackles one aspect of connecting with other students in the Flat World: once a geek, always a geek. See for yourself at Boolean Squared. (Or grab the RSS feed here.) Next week, Boolean Squared goes twice a week (Mondays and Thursdays).

Meanwhile, I also got a nice mention for Boolean Squared over at The Daily Cartoonist, who writes about webcomics on a regular basis. My comic was part of his weekly roundup.

And, if you haven’t gone there yet, I have set up a website for my other, longer comic pieces. I call it Kevin’s Comics because I am trying to be very original. (hahaha)

Peace (in comics),
Kevin

The Evolution of My Political Mind (as webcomic)

I loved the concept of the 24 Hour Comic Project that I took part in a few weeks ago that I decided to do it again on my own. This time, I trace my own development within the sphere of politics and urge folks in the United States to get out and vote. I am sharing a few of the frames here and hope that you will wander over to my new site for longer comics that I am now creating,in addition to my home for Boolean Squared.

See the rest of the comic over at my Kevin’s Comics Site

Peace (in comics with a message),

Kevin

One Graphic Novella in 24 hours

Well, I did it. In a 24 hour block of time that started yesterday morning with an idea, I created a comic book novella (to call it a graphic novel might be to give it more creedance than it deserves). The book runs 44 frames (over 22 pages) and is called “Brothers on Ice,” as it tells the story of the time when my brother pulled me out of a frozen river. I also tried to capture some of the “place” of my childhood a bit.

Really, though, the idea comes from watching the strong relationships of my own children. It has made me think about my brother when we were kids.

So, after finishing up the book, I delivered it (and the one created by my 10-year-old son) back to the comic book store, where they will send them into the 24 Hour Comic project people, who are archiving all of the comics that were created during the event. Pretty neat.

While my son used pencil and comic book formatting paper, I used Comic Life and MS Paint. One thing I just noticed is that you can export your comic out of Comic Life in any number of formats, including as an HTML site and also as a movie/video. That is pretty neat. So I am going to try to narrate Brothers on Ice and see where that takes me. (And, I am thinking, I would love to get my students creating a comic strip, export as a movie and add their own voices. That could be a powerful idea.)

Peace (in frames),
Kevin