AI Analogy: Wedding Bands and Disc Jockeys

Drums
Drums flickr photo by JP Carrascal shared under a Creative Commons (BY-SA) license

My father, before he retired, was an accountant by day, drummer by night. When I was growing up, he was always busy with music. His Fridays, Saturdays and sometimes Sundays were spent keeping the beat in a variety of different wedding and dance bands, and he traveled all over, playing with different combinations of musicians every gig. (He also gave private drum lessons during the week, but that’s not really part of this story.)

And then, quite suddenly, the gigs began to dry up. It was the start of the DJ Revolution, where one person or two with a mixing board could replace an entire band of live musicians. For wedding and party planners, the cost differential of hiring a single DJ versus an entire band was huge, and for many, the finances was the decision factor. Understandable, but regrettable.

What was lost was not just my father’s regular gigs, which petered out over a stretch of time, but also the element of live music at these events, which I contend is a huge loss for making a wedding or party something special. Oh, I know DJs can do a fine job of finding the right songs and making the right mix to get our hands in the air and all that (one of my sons is now a part-time party DJ, ironically), but I’ll always argue that being in the presence of a good live band is a transformative experience. You feel the music being created, and the connection between audience and musician in the same room is an energy you can’t quite replicate with machine. Watching a human performance is a visceral experience, tying an event to memories in ways that digital tracks cannot.

Anyway, my father’s gigs dried up as DJs became more prominent, and I was thinking of this shift recently as the ethics of the data sets of Artificial Intelligence, and the ease of use to create art with Generative AI, comes more into focus. If AI can write a script, or make a piece of art, or compose a piece of music, or produce a video, or whatever, and the cost differential is the bottom line for companies that would have otherwise hired real people to make real art, then the world will shift.

Like it did for my father and his generation of musicians.

We see this same issue now playing out in the strikes in Hollywood with writers and now actors, who, among other things, worry about if their creative talents will be replaced by AI in the future as cost-cutting measures. It’s a legitimate concern, I think.

What will be lost when my father’s generation of live musicians faded into the shadows of the machine is similar, too: the authenticity of interactive experience, of being in the immediate presence of a piece of art that was conceived by the human mind and brought into being through the creative process for an audience of one (you, when you experience the art, in whatever form that art has become).

I’m not sure how I feel about this cultural transformation, or if it can be slowed or altered at this point in time. Probably not. But I already mourn the loss as a member of the audience and as a maker of art, you know?

Even as I play around with Generative AI platforms and use AI to figure out its potential (and maybe new art forms, which is potentially exciting), I know I’ll hang on to the pen scratches on paper, to the power of a musician’s solo that is different in every performance, to the synergy and energy of actors in a scene, and to much more, but will the generations after us even care whether the art is live or if it synthetic?

I hope so.

Peace (Pondering It),
Kevin

Google’s New AI Duet Workspace: Hummingbird Haiku

I saw an invite to my Google Account to pilot Google’s integration of AI into its various apps called, I think, Duet AI. They are rolling out a bit of it at a time, and after some hemming and hawing, I decided to give it a go (I might still opt out at some point but given all the inquiry and experimenting I have been doing already, it seemed like another step). Google has an explanatory page about Duet here.

I experimented with Duet in Google Docs after deciding to do some poem collaboration with the AI (which I assume is powered by Bard). I began with a haiku about hummingbirds, and then asked the Duet AI to write one, too. It did, and there are some options for tweaking the text, if wanted. You can Recreate (I didn’t find this worked all that well but maybe that is because the haiku poems were short) or Refine (with a few different parameters).

Then, I kept going, back and forth (another game of AI Chat Tennis), and I even tried to get it to turn the Document of poems into a Presentation (which I saw happen in a demo but it told me that feature had not yet rolled out).  The BOLD poems are mine and the ITALICS poems are via Duet.

Google AI 1

I even asked it to generate a list of possible titles for our collection. I had to recreate this a few times. Most were drab. One ended up OK.

Google AI 2

I later added the collection of poems to Giphy and added my own animated birds in motion, because … well, hummingbirds, right?

My initial reaction — I could see Duet being helpful as a thinking partner. The tool didn’t feel too intrusive (it sits off to the side with a little icon) and when I opened it up, it gave me some possible ideas for use with my writing. I haven’t looked at my email platform yet nor the presentation platform, but I will.

I do wonder about how and when and if Duet will be integrated into Google’s school platforms, and what that might look like. (I think Google has said they are NOT pushing Duet and AI into school Google networks … yet)

Anyone else given Duet a go?

Peace (Experimenting),
Kevin

Observations On A ChatGPT Collaboration

one path, diverged

AI Image by Dall-E

Sometimes, you just need to play to figure out something new.

Yesterday, a few friends joined me in exploring a collaboration feature within ChatGPT that allows you to share out a query/response, and another person can then build on it, and then share it back out.

It works OK, but there is no overview map of where the strands get taken, and by whom. It’s easy to be using a link that someone else has already used and advanced, and you’re still in the past. Things can get confusing, quickly. It would make more sense to do this with a single partner, sharing information and queries and responses back and forth (this could be a classroom activity between two students, perhaps?)

There were about a half dozen friends working at various times, sharing back links here at the blog or on Twitter, and two strands emerged at the end, with a slight diversion. I brought both to a “close” this morning by asking ChatGPT to write a poem in the style of either Emily Dickinson or Walt Whitman.

Strand One: https://chat.openai.com/share/c70b7769-729e-4e8e-83da-f1ee1974e53a

Strand Two: https://chat.openai.com/share/09319ab7-363b-4f64-b297-2a1a0b59fbbf

You can still play around with the strands, if you want, as this game of ChatGPT Tennis, as Wendy calls it, is everlasting (I think). Just share the link to your extension somewhere and we’ll play on.

Peace (and Play),
Kevin

Feature: Chat Collaboration (or ChatGPT Tennis)

chat collab screenshot
My CLMOOC friends, Sarah and Wendy, were doing some riffing off a ChatGPT response the other day to a DS106 Daily Create when I noticed they were using a feature I had not seen before, allowing you to “share” out a ChatGPT query and response via a link.

This feature allows other people to then access and use the original query/response for further prompting — essentially giving an opportunity for what Wendy delightfully called “ChatGPT Tennis” (as in, return the volley to someone else, and build on an idea, then send it back).

I am curious about the ways this might be used by partners or teams of people, to work an idea into either variations or perhaps to further hone in on a kernel of an idea together. Wendy and her thinking partner do a nice job going over some possibilities in her Elevate Postcard video.

I did ask ChatGPT to create a 25 word story (about thunderstorms) and it generated the link for sharing, so if you want to play along and see how it works, here is the link to the original response. You will need to share the links of any iterations, however, as the original owners don’t get any notifications (which is too bad). You could do that here, in the comments, or on Twitter or Mastodon. Or you can decide not to share back out. It’s up to you.

Peace (Volley For Serve),
Kevin

Dialogue Notebooks: Using And Creating AI Thinking Partners

NowComment and AI: Dialogue Journal

I am fortunate to be connected to folks in my National Writing Project circles like Paul Allison, who administers Youth Voices network and the NowComment annotation site. Paul has been at the forefront in my circles in thinking a lot and experimenting with the possibilities of Generative AI as a technology tool that could help readers and writers.

I had noticed that Paul and a few others NWP-affiliated folks were experimenting with the concept of AI Thinking Partners at NowComment — AI generated bots that engage with a text — but I have only just dipped my toes into what he has been doing, now that my school year is over. Then I saw him ask folks to experiment by keeping a daily Dialogue Journal in NowComment, and experiment with the AI Thinking Partners that he and others have been building out (using the API of ChatGPT).

I jumped in and I have made my journal (from June 24-July 1) public, so feel free to peruse my daily writing, which was themed each day on thinking about Artificial Intelligence (which I have been doing a lot since ETMOOC2 in the Spring). Then, after my journal writing, I would ask the Thinking Partner to engage a bit in discussions with me in the margins.

Read my journal

Paul also met with me to talk through some of the steps to creating my own Thinking Partners, and I made three: JazzHands, with a creative arts persona; HaikuHere, which is designed to turn a text into haiku; and WriteOutRanger, which is an experiment for the Write Out project to have an AI “park ranger” engage in discussions about place-based learning.

AI Thinking Partners

I am still thinking through the elements of all this, and wondering in the back of my head how this might be helpful or not to students in a classroom. For now, I am in experiment mode, playing around and trying to learn through experience the possibilities of embedded AI Thinking Partners. I know I need to learn a lot more about Prompt Engineering, and Paul and others have gathered together a lot of resources to explore on this topic.

Peace (and Inquiry),
Kevin

PS — Do you want to set up your own AI Dialogue Notebook in NowComment? Here are the instructions at the NowComment site. Let me know how it goes.

Planet Money: Making A Podcast Written and Narrated By AI

Philips radio
Philips radio flickr photo by n0i2 shared under a Creative Commons (BY-SA) license

Planet Money, the podcast from NPR, just did a three-part series on exploring how Generative AI (like ChatGPT and Audio AI) could be used to create a podcast, and it is pretty fascinating, the journey they go on. I highly suggest a listen.

The final episode, with a script written entirely by ChatGPT – including a radio story script to demonstrate the theme of how machines changed an industry (telephone operators) — and co-hosted by an AI replicated voice file of a retired Planet Money host (Robert Smith) is in the third episode here.

Peace (and Podcasts),
Kevin

 

Getting Loopy: Logic Animation

I was trying out Loopy, a neat little systems thinking tool. I was pondering the recursive nature of Generative Chatbots eating poems on the Web for its database and then using those texts and format to regurgitate them when prompted for poems. Notice where human agency gets isolated here (is that true? maybe or maybe not)

My Loopy experiment

Peace (and Paths),
Kevin

PS — thanks to Richard Byrne for the suggestion on this one via his blog

AI-Assisted Lesson Planning and Generative Thinking

AI Teacher Assistant

I came across another new site that seeks to use AI to make the lives of teaching a bit easier.  Or so it suggests. I don’t mind experimenting with some of these sites because I am always curious about what the output will be and if it is useful or not.

Teaching AIssistant (get it?) is a Lesson Planning site that uses AI to generate Lesson Plans on ideas. There are some basic questions and prompts to get things started and then the AI does its thing. Since I am in the midst of a unit on Argument Writing with my sixth graders, I figured I would give Teaching AIssistant a try.

My guiding prompt: generate a lesson plan that has students “write an argument that includes claims, counter-claims and a refutation of the counter-claim.

This is what it generated for me:

Lesson Plan: Crafting A Written Argument

Overview

In this lesson, students will learn how to craft a written argument by analyzing a real-world problem related to their age group and writing an argument that includes claims, counter-claims, and a refutation of the counter-claim.

Objectives

  • Students will be able to identify the main points in an argument.
  • Students will be able to craft a written argument that includes claims, counter-claims, and a refutation of the counter-claim.
  • Students will be able to identify the key elements of persuasive writing.
  • Students will be able to evaluate a written argument based on its persuasiveness.

Materials

  • Whiteboard and markers
  • Worksheets with the real-world problem and writing prompt
  • Rubric for assessing student work

Introduction (10 minutes)

Begin the lesson by asking the students if they ever disagreed with something someone else said or did. Allow time for students to share their experiences. Then, introduce the concept of persuasive writing and its purpose. Explain that they will be learning how to craft a written argument, which is a type of persuasive writing used to convince others of a specific viewpoint.

Real-World Problem (15 minutes)

Divide the students into small groups and provide each group with the real-world problem worksheet. The problem should be one that is relevant to their age group and has divided opinion.

For example: The school has proposed to replace the playground equipment with new equipment that increasing numbers of students cannot use safely. There are strong voices of support and strong voices of opposition.

Instruct the students to read the problem and discuss possible viewpoints with their group. Help them to identify their target audience.

Writing Prompts (20 minutes)

Provide each student with a worksheet that outlines the writing prompt. The writing prompt should ask the students to write an argument that includes claims, counter-claims, and a refutation of the counter-claim. Remind them to consider the viewpoints of others and to use evidence to support their claims.

For example: Write an argument that either supports or opposes the proposal to replace the playground equipment. Address the concerns of those who disagree with your position.”

Peer Review (10 minutes)

Pairs of students should read and evaluate each other’s work. Guidelines should be provided to ensure students are clear on what to look for (eg inclusion of viewpoints different from their own perspective, whether information is persuasive, logic, organization, etc.).

Closing (5 minutes)

Review the main elements of persuasive writing and the purpose of crafting a written argument. Emphasize that being able to craft effective arguments will be an important skill throughout their academic career and in life.

Assessment

Use the provided rubric to evaluate student work. The rubric should assess students on their ability to identify the main points in an argument, craft a written argument that includes claims, counter-claims, and a refutation of the counter-claim, identify the key elements of persuasive writing, and evaluate a written argument based on its persuasiveness.

Not too bad, I suppose, although a bit too generalized, but I was curious how ChatGPT would analyze that AI-generated lesson plan, so I took that entire lesson plan, popped it into ChatGPT and asked it to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the lesson plan first generated by Teaching AIssistant. (Kinda strange to have one Generative AI critique the work of another Generative AI, right? And since one is built off the other, it’s like making the AI criticize itself. The AI don’t mind.)

Here is ChatGPT’s analysis of the Teaching AIssistant plan:

Strengths of the Lesson Plan:

  1. Clear objectives: The lesson plan clearly outlines the objectives of the lesson, including the ability to identify main points, craft a written argument with specific elements, and evaluate persuasive writing.
  2. Real-world application: By using a real-world problem relevant to the students’ age group, the lesson plan helps students see the practical application of persuasive writing skills.
  3. Active learning: The lesson plan encourages student engagement through group discussions, writing prompts, and peer review, allowing students to actively participate and learn from each other.
  4. Step-by-step structure: The lesson plan provides a clear structure with distinct sections, including an introduction, problem analysis, writing prompts, peer review, and closing. This helps maintain a logical flow and facilitates comprehension and learning.
  5. Assessment rubric: The lesson plan includes a rubric to assess student work, which provides clear criteria for evaluation and helps maintain consistency in grading.

Weaknesses of the Lesson Plan:

  1. Time allocation: The time allocated for certain sections, such as the introduction (10 minutes) and peer review (10 minutes), might not be sufficient for effective student engagement and meaningful discussions. More time could be allotted to ensure thorough understanding and participation.
  2. Lack of differentiation: The lesson plan does not address differentiation for students with diverse learning needs or abilities. It would be beneficial to include strategies or modifications to accommodate different learners, such as providing additional support for struggling students or extension activities for advanced students.
  3. Limited focus on counter-claims: While the lesson plan mentions the inclusion of counter-claims and their refutation, it does not provide explicit guidance on how to develop and address counter-arguments effectively. Including specific strategies or examples for handling counter-claims would enhance the lesson plan.
  4. Assessment limitations: The rubric provided for assessment covers the main objectives of the lesson, but it does not account for other aspects of writing, such as grammar, clarity of expression, or creativity. Consider expanding the rubric to encompass a broader range of writing skills and qualities.
  5. Lack of technology integration: The lesson plan relies solely on traditional resources, such as whiteboards, markers, and worksheets. Integrating technology tools or resources, such as online research or writing platforms, could enhance the lesson plan by incorporating digital literacy skills and providing additional learning opportunities.

Overall, the lesson plan has several strengths, including clear objectives, real-world application, and active learning strategies. However, addressing the weaknesses, such as time allocation, differentiation, and inclusion of specific guidance for counter-claims, would further improve the plan’s effectiveness and comprehensiveness.

OK — so that critique is pretty specific and has a lot in there that I might agree with or at least consider if I were to tweak the plan further for actual use in the classroom. I then asked ChatGPT to revise the Teaching AIssistant plan, based on its own analysis.

Lesson Plan: Crafting a Persuasive Argument with Engaging Activities

Overview: In this dynamic lesson, students will explore the art of crafting a persuasive argument by analyzing a real-world problem relevant to their age group. They will engage in interactive activities, collaborate in groups, and use technology to enhance their learning experience.

Objectives:

  1. Students will identify and articulate the main points in an argument.
  2. Students will construct a well-structured written argument that includes claims, counter-claims, and a refutation of the counter-claim.
  3. Students will analyze and apply key elements of persuasive writing.
  4. Students will evaluate the persuasiveness of a written argument using critical thinking skills.

Materials:

  1. Interactive whiteboard or projector
  2. Laptops, tablets, or smartphones with internet access
  3. Worksheets with the real-world problem and writing prompt
  4. Rubric for assessing student work

Introduction (15 minutes):

  1. Grab students’ attention by presenting an engaging video clip or a thought-provoking scenario related to the real-world problem they will be exploring.
  2. Facilitate a class discussion by asking open-ended questions about persuasive writing and its purpose. Encourage students to share their thoughts and personal experiences.

Real-World Problem Exploration (20 minutes):

  1. Divide students into small groups and provide each group with the real-world problem worksheet. Ensure the problem is relevant and relatable to their age group.
  2. Instruct students to analyze the problem, discuss various viewpoints within their groups, and brainstorm possible arguments. Encourage critical thinking and lively discussions.
  3. Utilize the interactive whiteboard or projector to have each group present their main points and arguments to the class. This promotes engagement and knowledge sharing.

Writing Prompts and Technology Integration (30 minutes):

  1. Provide each student with a writing prompt worksheet. Enhance their engagement by introducing technology tools, such as online research platforms or writing software.
  2. Ask students to conduct online research to gather evidence and support their claims. Emphasize the importance of considering different viewpoints.
  3. Encourage students to use digital tools to create multimedia elements for their arguments, such as images, videos, or infographics.
  4. Facilitate peer collaboration and feedback by utilizing online platforms for real-time document sharing and commenting. This fosters active participation and allows students to learn from each other’s work.

Argument Showdown (15 minutes):

  1. Organize an argument showdown where pairs of students present and defend their arguments to the class.
  2. Encourage respectful debates and create a supportive environment for students to challenge and question each other’s viewpoints.
  3. Incorporate audience participation by allowing classmates to ask questions and provide constructive feedback.
  4. Emphasize the importance of effective communication, critical thinking, and evidence-based reasoning during the argument showdown.

Closing and Reflection (10 minutes):

  1. Recap the main elements of persuasive writing and its real-world applications.
  2. Engage students in a reflective discussion about their learning experience and the challenges they encountered.
  3. Encourage students to consider how they can apply their newfound skills in other academic subjects and real-life situations.
  4. Conclude by highlighting the significance of crafting persuasive arguments as a lifelong skill and the ability to influence positive change.

Assessment: Utilize the provided rubric to assess student work, considering their ability to identify main points, construct persuasive arguments with supporting evidence, analyze key elements of persuasive writing, and evaluate the persuasiveness of arguments. Additionally, consider including criteria for creativity, clarity of expression, and effective use of technology resources.

Much better, right? Finally, I asked ChatGPT to generate a list of “real world problems” for sixth graders to grapple with in an argument writing assignment.

Here’s a list of ten real-world problems suitable for 12-year-old students to use in this lesson:

  1. Should schools have mandatory uniform policies?
  2. Should junk food be banned from school cafeterias?
  3. Should students be assigned homework over school breaks?
  4. Should the school day start later to accommodate students’ sleep patterns?
  5. Should cell phones be allowed in classrooms?
  6. Should schools eliminate standardized testing?
  7. Should students have a say in determining the curriculum?
  8. Should animals be used for cosmetic testing?
  9. Should single-use plastics be banned to protect the environment?
  10. Should physical education be a required subject in schools?

These problems are age-appropriate and can elicit diverse viewpoints, allowing students to engage in meaningful discussions and develop persuasive arguments.

All this took less than 15 minutes. Now, none of it was new to me and my lessons around teaching Argument Writing to my students but if I were a new teacher, this kind of back and forth, and using the AI as thinking partner, would be potentially very valuable (particularly if you worked in a school district that requires teachers to file lesson plans for administrative review — luckily, I am not required to do that).

I’ve always been tinkering with Curipod, which is an interactive presentation platform fueled by AI generation, and it is pretty nifty. You give it points of discussion and it creates a slideshow presentation with various interactive elements — word clouds, quizzes, drawings, etc.

You can check out my sample on the introduction of Argument here. I am in the midst of using Curipod for a presentation this summer for teachers on how AI might be considered for use to support English Language Learners and students with learning disabilities.

Peace (and plans),
Kevin

 

Poem: Landscape of the Digital

In A Dreamy Landscape

I’ve been doing periodic experiments with inputting parts of or entire poems into Ai Art Platforms, to see what comes out the other side. This one fit nicely with the poem’s main idea — of a dream landscape — that was written from a one-word prompt off Mastodon (“dreamy”). The AI platform I have been using the most these days is Adobe Firefly, since it allows a lot of manipulation of settings.

Peace (and landscapes),
Kevin

U.S. Surgeon General’s Report: Social Media And Youth Mental Health

Social Media and Youth Mental Health — Current Priorities of the U.S ...

I used the new ChatPDF to gather some information from the new report by the US Surgeon General about the impact of social media on the mental health of young people.

You should read it.

The report is sobering, and confirms much of what so many of us as parents, family members, and educators see: (unless you run one of the main social media platforms, apparently, and then this report is overblown): the algorithmic addictive quality of social media has our kids not just glued to screens and feeds, but has them craving and fearing the attention it gives them, as well.

I asked ChatPDF to pull out some shareable highlights along what I think are important questions.

First, I asked what parents can do:

– Set and implement boundaries on social media use for children.

– Monitor their children’s social media use and be aware of the content they are consuming or exposed to.

– Encourage healthy habits such as physical activity and adequate sleep, which may be disrupted by excessive social media use.

– Foster open communication with their children about their experiences on social media and any concerns they may have.

– Seek professional help if their child is experiencing mental health issues related to social media use.

Second, I asked what young people can do:

– Be mindful of their social media use and how it affects their mental health and well-being.

– Set boundaries for themselves, such as limiting screen time or taking breaks from social media.

– Be aware of the potential risks associated with social media use, such as cyberbullying or exposure to harmful content.

– Seek help if they are experiencing mental health issues related to social media use.

– Use social media in positive ways, such as connecting with friends and family or finding support communities.

Third, I asked what lawmakers can do:

– Develop and enforce regulations that require social media companies to prioritize the safety and well-being of children and adolescents.

– Fund research to better understand the impact of social media on youth mental health and identify effective interventions.

– Support education campaigns that promote safe and responsible social media use among young people, parents, caregivers, and educators.

– Work with technology companies to develop age-appropriate social media platforms for children and adolescents that prioritize privacy, safety, and positive mental health outcomes.

– Provide resources for mental health professionals to address the unique challenges posed by social media use among young people.

Fourth, I asked about the positive benefits of social media on young people:

– Provides positive community and connection with others who share identities, abilities, and interests.

– Provides access to important information and resources. – Creates a space for self-expression and creativity.

– Facilitates communication with friends and family members who live far away or are otherwise difficult to reach.

– Can help reduce feelings of isolation or loneliness.

– Can provide a sense of belonging to marginalized or stigmatized groups.

– Can be used to raise awareness about important social issues or advocate for change.

And finally, I asked what key questions remain unanswered in the report:

– What are the long-term effects of social media use on children and adolescents?

– How does social media use affect different groups of children and adolescents, such as those with pre-existing mental health conditions or those from marginalized communities?

– What is the role of social media in the development and maintenance of mental health disorders among youth?

– How can we design and deploy social media platforms that promote positive mental health outcomes for youth while minimizing potential harms?

– What is the most effective way to educate parents, caregivers, educators, and young people themselves about safe and responsible social media use?

By the way, the report has some handy handouts at the end that dovetail with some of my queries and flesh out the findings a bit more.

I also asked: is it hopeless?

No, it is not hopeless. While the U.S. Surgeon General’s Advisory on Social Media and Youth Mental Health highlights the potential risks and harms of social media use among young people, it also emphasizes that there are many factors that shape the impact of social media on youth mental health, and that different children and adolescents are affected in different ways. The report also provides recommendations for policymakers, technology companies, parents, caregivers, educators, and young people themselves to mitigate the risks of social media use and promote positive mental health outcomes. With continued research, education, and collaboration among stakeholders, it is possible to create a safer and more supportive online environment for young people.

And then I ended with: Will AI make things better or make things worse? (It took a long time to generate this response):

The impact of AI on the relationship between social media and youth mental health is still unclear, and it could go either way. On the one hand, AI could be used to identify and mitigate potential harms of social media use among young people, such as cyberbullying or exposure to harmful content. For example, AI algorithms could be trained to detect signs of distress or negative emotions in social media posts and provide resources or support to users who may be struggling. On the other hand, AI could also exacerbate existing problems by amplifying harmful content or creating new forms of online harassment or manipulation. Ultimately, the impact of AI on youth mental health will depend on how it is developed, deployed, and regulated.

Side Note: I like the ChatPDF as a tool to interrogate a PDF. It does a good job of using the source document to scour information, make summaries and more.

Peace (and plans),
Kevin